Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good The highly anticipated Volkswagen Scirocco R finally hit our shores in January 2012. The Scirocco R defiantly stands out in the Volkswagen pack with its menacing shark like front end that features three rather large air in-takes and a slim lined grille that adds to the overall sleekness of the vehicle.

The Scirocco R’s stance is also very aggressive with its high and bold shoulder line and sexy wide butt.

Topping off the overall sporty look is a set of 19-inch alloy wheels wrapped in 235/35 R19 Pirelli rubber and some daytime running lights.
Not so good The sharply raked rear of the vehicle looks beautiful but it does hamper rearward visibility quite a lot. If it wasn’t for rear parking sensors the Scirocco R would be a nightmare to park.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Interior styling is top notch and what you have come to expect from the people over at Volkswagen. The dash is covered in soft touch plastics and the cabin features piano black and brushed metallic highlights throughout the vehicle.

The chunky sports steering wheel feels great under hand, the top and bottom of the wheel features perforated leather and the exposed stitching that is yellow in colour add a nice touch to the overall design. The three spoke steering wheel is also the home for cruise control, audio volume and settings and trip computer options.
Not so good Because of the low slung nature of the Scirocco and the high bolstering of the race bucket seats you’ll find yourself lowering into the car rather than just jumping in. Now, this isn’t necessarily a bad thing for those of us that are quite trim and nimble. But, for people that are a on the big side might find jumping in and out quite difficult as the interior is snug.

The Scirocco’s interior is subtle in design; Volkswagen could have done more to further distinguish the Scirocco R from the rest of its model range.
Performance

Performance

Good Powering the Scirocco R is a 2.0-litre four-cylinder direct-injection turbocharged petrol engine, the people over at Volkswagen simply call it the 2.0 TSI.

The 2.0-litre turbocharged engine pumps out 188kW of power and a tasty 330Nm of torque that is available from 2,500 to 5,000 rpm. Sending power to the front wheels is a six-speed manual transmission or there is the option of a six-speed DSG with Sport Mode and Triptronic Function.

Overall the manual is very easy to drive, the clutch feels well weighted and the six-speed shifter falls nicely under hand, resulting in silky smooth shifts. The 330Nm of torque also ensures that engine pick up is responsive in any gear.

The DSG is a lot of fun and easy to commute to-and-from work. It also offers up a sports mode that raises the revs and holds gears for longer. If it's quick gear changes you're after the DSG is hard to look past, even manual purist's that swear by changing your own gears will be pleasantly surprised.

The exhaust note is also very noticeable in the cabin, it has a low down ‘gargle’ that you would expect to hear in something with a lot more cc’s.
Not so good When you put that much power to the front wheels you get torque steer, apply the right foot too heavily and you get a vehicle that is steering itself and tugging at the wheel. Not ideal when you want to make a quick getaway off the lights.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good The Volkswagen Scirocco R features a specially tuned sport chassis that is combined with something called XDL (Extended Electronic Differential Lock).

XDL helps compensate for understeer (very common in front wheel drive vehicles), as soon as the intelligent electronics detects wheel spin of the front wheel at the inside of a curve during spirited driving, the ESP hydraulics apply braking pressure at the specific wheel to restore optimal traction.

In terms of suspension the front features a MacPherson strut type while the rear features a four-link set-up.

Handling is also sharpened by Volkswagen’s innovative Adaptive Chassis Control. This system continually adjusts damping of individual wheels to insure the best possible ride for any road condition.
Not so good It is hard to criticise the Scirocco R’s ride and handling because as a hot hatch sports coupe it ticks all the right boxes. But, as a daily driver the suspension can be a tad on the firm side and when you put the Adaptive Chassis Control system into comfort mode the suspension tends to bottom out on pot holes and harsh bumps.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good The Volkswagen Scirocco R is a very attractive machine; parking one of these babies in your driveway will surely leave your neighbours in envy.

Fuel consumption is also a plus given this is a turbocharged petrol engine, the official combined fuel consumption is 8.1-litres per 100km, not bad if you consider the power and torque figures the Scirocco R produces.
Not so good The Scirocco R is fairly reasonably priced for what you get, however you only four seats so it isn’t as practical as say a Golf GTI or Golf R. There is also the high running cost that you have to keep in mind when purchasing and owning.