Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good Arriving Down Under in February 2009, and receiving a facelift in July 2012, the Passat 'CC' (Comfort Coupe) has its own unique sheet metal compared to the more upright Passat sedan/wagon it shares mechanicals with underneath. The four seat, four door coupe no doubt takes inspiration from the Mercedes-Benz CLS-Class (based on the more upright E-Class) in concept, and its elegant lines see it perched on top as VW’s top-of-the-range offering (err, excluding the most expensive Touareg SUV of course). The Passat CC's new chrome radiator grille design with three cross-fins and the redesigned bonnet design make it quite sleek and classy. It's complemented by a high quality build and 'fit and finish'. The coupé like sedan definitely turns heads.
Not so good The CC is a little tight in the back - if you don't appreciate the sleek styling and prefer more room then perhaps opt for the Passat sedan or wagon.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good We like the brushed aluminium highlights on the dash; and whilst the wide front and rear seats are on the firm side they offer good support and are covered in high quality leather as standard. The boot is shallow yet wide and deep, so a large amount of cargo can still be fitted inside. The Volkswagen CC also has a whole host of standard features that include a Driver Fatigue Detection system, Satellite Navigation, rear view camera, stainless steel door sill plates and front comfort head restraints with additional front-rear adjustment.
Not so good The centre console/dash design is rather plain; however all the buttons are logically arranged. The elegant rear sloping roofline results in less headroom and upon entry and exit one must remember to lower their head. From the driver’s seat the sloping rear roofline also reduce rearward vision.
Performance

Performance

Good The Volkswagen CC comes equipped with either a petrol direct injection (FSI) or diesel (TDI) engine both with BlueMotion Technology offering Start/Stop and battery regeneration. The frugal 125 TDI is a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbo diesel engine that produces 125kW of power and 350Nm of torque while using 5.7-litres per 100km (combined). The V6 FSI with 4MOTION is a 3.6-litre six-cylinder petrol engine that produces 220kW of power and 350Nm of torque while using 9.7-litres per 100km (combined). Both the TDI and the FSI engines are paired with Volkswagen’s 6-speed Direct Shift Gearbox (DSG) including Sports Mode and Triptronic Function. While the V6 FSI Volkswagen CC features 4MOTION all-wheel drive technology as standard.
Not so good The petrol V6 prefers more expensive premium unleaded and is significantly thirstier than the smaller diesel engine = $$$.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good The 125 TDI is front-wheel drive while with the V6 FSI comes with 4MOTION All Wheel Drive, which offers excellent grip! The Passat CC's suspension accompanied with the impressive electro-mechanical power-assisted steering makes it a joy to drive on most roads. The Turbo Diesel has loads of torque to pull you out of a corner so there’s little delay in getting back up to speed. Although both feature firm suspension that stays quite flat during the corners - it’s surprisingly comfortable and will absorb the harshest of bumps with ease.
Not so good Over rougher surfaces the ride is on the firm side, especially for those in the rear - and not surprisingly the Sport setting takes it up a notch further.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Similar in concept to the Mercedes CLS-Class, yet much less pricy. Eight airbags, electronic stability control and ABS brakes 'ticks' the safety box. A standard full-size spare wheel is reassuring in this age of 'space savers'.
Not so good Buyers are asked to hand over an extra $10k between the Turbo Diesel Passat CC and the 'regular' Passat sedan with the same engine (however, the CC does have more standard features).