Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good Arriving Down Under in May 2013, the seventh generation Volkswagen Golf could be mistaken as a facelift of the previous model, however don't for one minute let this stop you considering this VW Golf.

What Volkswagen has done is take it's successful formula and improved upon it at no extra cost to its potential customers.

The seventh generation Golf doesn't stray too far from its DNA, featuring the typical C-pillars, the long roof line and the characteristic front and rear sections that relate to previous models.

However, the tweaked design does have a wider appearance, the bonnet looks flatter and the front grille is slimmed down, while the front and rear lights have a more sculpted looked featuring a sharper design.
Not so good Some might argue that the Golf is a bland design (yet just as the Porsche 911’s design also evolves slower than most, Volkswagen aren't trying to incorporate all the latest design trends into the iconic Golf).
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good The seventh generation Golf has grown a little in proportions. At 4,349mm the new Golf is 150mm longer than the previous model, while the wheelbase has also been increased by 46mm to 2,620mm.

The slight increases in length and width, as well as the increased wheelbase and optimised track widths, create more room for occupants.

Passengers in the rear can now enjoy 15mm more knee room and 31mm of shoulder room. There's also a 60:40 split backrest that is standard in all versions of the new Golf and can be folded down. When folded, a nearly level cargo floor is created with a length of 1,558mm. Cargo capacity has grown by 30 litres to 380 litres.

All controls fall under hand with ease, while most surfaces are covered in soft-touch materials for a more premium look and feel.

We really like Volkswagens new 5.8-inch touchscreen, the software design is simplistic and styling.
Not so good Whilst you can't argue against the quality or premium look & feel to the interior, some may find the simplistic design a tad bland.
Performance

Performance

Good The Golf range comes with the choice a 90TSI, 103TSI or 110TDI engine.

First up is the 90TSI, 1.4-litre twincharged petrol engine, producing 90kW of power and 200Nm of torque when matched to a 6-speed manual transmission as standard or 7-speed DSG dual clutch automatic transmission (optional).

The 103TSI is a 1.4-litre twincharged petrol engine, producing 103kW of power and 250Nm of torque when matched to a 7-speed DSG dual clutch automatic transmission as standard.

Rounding out the engine line-up is the 110TDI, 2.0-litre turbocharged diesel, producing 110kW of power and 320Nm of torque when matched to a 6-speed DSG dual clutch automatic transmission as standard.

Our test vehicle was equipped with a 90TSI, 1.4-litre twincharged petrol engine matched to a 6-speed manual, we really think this is a fun combo, the 1.4-litre twincharged engine has next to no turbo lag and plenty of torque down low in the rev range, 200Nm from 1,400rpm to be exact.
Not so good While the 90TSI is a fun little unit to boot around in, it does tend to sip petrol when pushed.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good Ride and handling is really impressive, there is a good blend of comfort and cornering performance on offer. Steering feel is solid at speeds and feather light while moving at slower speeds(e.g. car parks and inner city driving).
Not so good An entry level Mazda 3 may be a touch more responsive than the competing Golf when pushed hard, however, the Golf definitely feels more refined.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Excellent safety credentials with seven airbags as standard across the range. Volkswagen has taken a great product and made it even better with its seventh generation Golf, along with its safety credentials Volkswagen has introduced capped price servicing for the first time giving customers another good reason to consider a Golf.
Not so good Tick too many tasty options and the price can also quickly spiral upwards.