Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good Arriving in Australia at the start of 2007, the Eos’ confidant wide stance is a result of a platform sourced from the Passat (VW’s medium passenger car) rather than the narrower Golf. The platform has been shortened and strengthened, resulting in an impressively stiff body for a convertible. The fancy folding metal roof features an integrated large sliding glass sunroof and unlike the competing Peugeot 308 CC the top of the windscreen frame isn’t positioned almost over your head so entry and exit is easier. Equally as important for this segment of vehicle is that the Eos looks great with the roof up or down (unlike a number of competitors which appear frumpy roof up).
Not so good With the roof up and sunroof open the Eos is noisy (more so than with the roof down!?). When wide open the large front doors can be a reach to close from the driver’s seat.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Excellent interior – luxurious feel with impressive fit AND finish. Examples being the classy adjustable blue instrument illumination and the modern looking aluminium inserts in the dashboard and doors. The sports front seats are excellent and the standard leather covered multi-function steering wheel that adjusts for both rake and reach is great to hold. Moving to the second row the two seat bench (Note: no new convertibles seat three in the rear) is relatively comfortable, providing adequate head and legroom. Other points of note are a user friendly 6 ½ inch touch screen display, two zone auto climate-control air-conditioning, quality cupholders, and a decent sized glove box (it’s chillable) and separate storage compartment located in the front centre armrest.
Not so good Leather seats (Vienna or Napa) is an optional cost on all grades; however the standard black cloth seat upholstery looks like it will wear well. Boot space can’t match the Peugeot 308 CC.
Performance

Performance

Good Two four cylinder engines to choose from: the 103TDI 2.0L turbo diesel (103kW of power & 320Nm of torque) and the 147TSI 2.0L turbo petrol (147kW & 280Nm). The petrol is definitely the pick of the two - this same engine was used in the excellent Mark V Golf GTi hot hatch! Of course the 147TSI Eos is not as fast as that car (blame the heavy roof mechanism and necessary body strengthening), but against its convertible competitors it sure is. The smooth and precise six speed manual is a joy to use (or buyers can opt for the dual clutch automatic DSG gearbox).
Not so good Whilst competitive in it’s class, the 2.0L diesel is a less impressive match with the Eos. It’s a heavier engine, is noisier, and the Eos’s refined handling suffers a little as a result of the extra weight over the front wheels.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good The stiff platform (thanks partly to the reinforced windscreen pillars and cross member braces underneath) contributes to the Eos achieving impressive levels of ride and handling. Scuttle shake (the wobbles), a negative term synonymous with convertibles - is hardly apparent here. The Eos is well balanced and responds well to steering inputs, yet the ride is comfortable (at least on the standard 17 inch alloy wheels).
Not so good BMW’s sporty 1-Series convertible takes the handling level up another notch (however the Volkswagen has the more comfortable ride of the two).
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Ticks the safety box with standard Anti-lock brakes, Electronic Stability Control and six airbags. Standard cruise control and park distance sensors will come in use, as will the 12 volt sockets (2 in the cabin).
Not so good No longer the newest player in the segment.