Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good Whilst the swoopy almost sporty design, a rear spoiler and big 18 inch alloy wheels might mistake this as a soft roader, think again. A separate chassis, live rear axle, low range gearbox and lots of ground clearance = a 4WD that can really handle the rough stuff.
Not so good The Ssangyong Kyron arrived in Australia back in January 2006 with the ‘mid-life’ facelift arriving surprisingly early (Sep 2007) = a design that is no longer the newest kid on the block. Urban styling with a rugged ladder frame underneath = looks like a city boy, but behaves more like a rugged country cowboy (however some might like this).
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good The 2007 year facelift saw round air vents replace the more conservative rectangular design and brings a bit more fun into the otherwise comfortable yet slightly quirky interior. All grades feature comfortable front row seats, plenty of storage space (we like the big boot with a storage compartment under the floor), a second row bench that folds flat 60 / 40, and 12 volt outlets in both the second row and in the rear. The entry level M200 XDI grade features steering wheel mounted audio controls and a driver’s seat that adjusts for height whilst the more premium SPR grade adds leather seats which are both electrically adjustable and heated in the front row (over the standard cloth) and climate control air-conditioning.
Not so good Not exactly a class leading interior – materials are below the class best, the leather bound steering wheel adjusts for rake (up and down) but not reach (in and out) and whilst the second row bench is comfortable, rear knee room is lacking for adults. If you're a Ssangyong fan and require more than five seats, look to the larger Rexton 4WD or the Stavic People Mover.
Performance

Performance

Good Both grades feature a 2.0 litre, four cylinder, turbo diesel that produces 104kW of power and 310Nm of torque. The engine is smooth, quiet for a diesel, and the optional six speed Automatic gearbox is a good match. Fuel economy is a low 7.3L per 100km with the Manual transmission and 8.4L with the Automatic (official combined average).
Not so good The Kyron is by no means FAST (no surprise when you combine 100 odd kW’s with an almost 2 tonne kerb weight.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good On road the Kyron drives acceptable, but only if the road surface is relatively smooth (so free of bumps and potholes). Off road the Kyron is much better, thanks to the rugged under body, long travel suspension and fat 18 inch tyres. Engine noise suppression is also very good – ensuring a quiet cabin.
Not so good Rough on-road surfaces result in a less than composed ride and the handling too easily becomes sloppy as speed increases and the road twists and turns, but not really surprising for a vehicle with a rigid rear axle suspension (think commercial vehicle not passenger car). The steering displays kickback on less than perfect roads and the brake pedal has an almost overly long travel.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Ticks the safety box with standard anti lock brakes, electronic stability control, hill descent control, reverse parking sensors and driver & front passenger and front & rear side curtain airbags. Electric folding side mirrors and remote keyless entry are also standard on both grades.
Not so good Sells in relatively low numbers (Ssangyong is still a niche brand in Australia) so we wouldn’t expect impressive re sale value.