Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good Arriving in Australia in October 2011 the oddly named Skoda Yeti is the fifth newest member to join the ever expanding Skoda vehicle range. The Skoda Yeti features a bold design; the front is dominated by a large grille that is highlighted by a chrome ‘look’ trim and the large front headlights seem to peer back at you in a friendly manner. From side on the Yeti appears to have a slight slope to the roofline that gives the vehicle a compact yet flowing look. Meanwhile, the large wheel arches feature flared guards that give the Yeti a slightly masculine feel.
Not so good The Skoda Yeti is one good looking ride; our only criticism would be the large plastic look and feel rear bumper.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good On the outside the Skoda Yeti looks compact, but on the inside it’s quite large. Passengers have plenty of legroom and headroom thanks in part to the ‘VarioFlex’ seat arrangement; there are three separate seats each with adjustable backrest and the outer seats can slide backwards and forwards (after the middle seat has been removed). The rear seats can also be folded forward with the backrest folded down and removed altogether. This is pretty handy if you have large items like a bike or pram to carry. The dash is covered in black soft touch plastics that look good and have a textured feel.
Not so good The Skoda Yeti feels a little bland on the inside, there are quality materials but there is a lot of dark and mid tones. The centre console also seems a little dated and could use a better or updated audio unit.
Performance

Performance

Good There are three engines to choose from across the Yeti range. To start things off the 77TSI FWD features a 1.2-litre four-cylinder turbocharged petrol engine that produces 77kW of power and 175Nm of torque. Sitting in the middle of the bunch is the 112TSI 4x4 features a 1.8-litre four-cylinder turbocharged petrol engine that produces 112kW of power and 250Nm of torque. And, rounding out the range is the 103TDI 4x4 featuring a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine that produces 103kW of power and 320Nm of torque. The 77TSI only comes with front-wheel drive while the 112TSI and 103TDI both come with constant four-wheel drive. All variants come with a 6-speed manual transmission; the 77TSI has the option of a 7-speed DSG gearbox while the 112TSI and 103TDI have the option of a 6-speed DSG gearbox. The 77TSI 6-speed manual and the 103TDI 6-speed DSG both have plenty of oomph, but the 320Nm of torque supplied by the 103TDI engine feels more sporty. We had a lot of fun in the 77TSI when mated to the 6-speed manual, but it isn’t ideal for city driving or the daily commute. Most people will want to option up to the DSG so they can cruise around without having to change gears. Although the manual transmission is rather smooth and the light clutch pedal is pretty good too.
Not so good We found the 103TDI mated to the 6-speed DSG a little jerky in traffic, but was superb when accelerating off the lights.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good After driving the Yeti around for a while we noticed that it has quite a firm ride for a Compact SUV. The firmer suspension setup makes the Yeti nimble in tight spaces and keeps the vehicle fairly flat when pushing through corners.
Not so good The firmer suspension is good for handling but not so much for comfort. The older generation might not enjoy the firmer ride.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good The Skoda Yeti is starting to climb in the pricing scale, but that extra money you’re spending does go towards some impressive German technology – Turbocharged engines? Check. Diesel engine? Check. DSG gearbox? Check. There is also the comfort in knowing that the Yeti comes fitted with seven airbags as standard which includes dual front, front side, curtain and driver’s knee airbags.
Not so good Because Skoda shares its technology with Volkswagen they also share the same pricy servicing costs.