Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good The current generation Grand Scenic arrive here in February 2007. Compared to the Scenic (which is no longer sold in Australia) the Grand Scenic has a wheelbase 50mm longer and overall is 230mm longer. As a result the Grand Scenic adds two fold-flat third row seats bringing the total seat count to seven.
Not so good It’s no spring chicken - whilst this generation Grand Scenic has only been here since 2007, it was released in Europe way back in 2003. This shape model was actually replaced by all new design in Europe back in the third quarter of 2009.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good An airy cabin with excellent visibility all round. The driving position is comfortable thanks to a steering wheel (leather trimmed) which adjusts for reach (in and out) and rake (up and down) AND a driver’s seat with height and lumbar adjustment. Available in one grade, named ‘Dynamique’, equals standard climate control air-conditioning, an air-chilled glovebox, rear side retracting sunshades and clever front and rear under floor storage bins. The Grand Scenic seats seven – the three individual middle row seats offer slide adjustment and are also removable.
Not so good The third-row seats are best suited for kids, not great levels of room back here. Removing the three middle row seats leaves an uneven floor and they are difficult to refit.
Performance

Performance

Good The sole engine on offer is a 2.0L 4cyl petrol which generates 98kW of power and 191Nm of torque matched to a four speed automatic gearbox.
Not so good With seven people aboard, the Grand Scenic can struggle. At just over 1,500kg the kerb weight is impressively low for seven seats; however the problem is the less than impressive 2.0L petrol engine and four speed auto transmission pairing. The official combined fuel economy average of 8.6L per 100km/h is by no means class leading against turbo diesel powered competitors.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good The Grand Scenic displays minimal body roll and compared to a number of seven seat People Mover's, it handles more than adequately.
Not so good By no means Renault’s best driving car, we wish the electrically assisted steering felt even nearly as good as on the French brand’s brilliant Clio hot hatch. The chassis dynamics are also on the soft side, and against the class leading Honda Odyssey it’s clearly not a true driver’s car.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Ticks the safety box with standard driver and front passenger, driver and passenger side and side curtain airbags as well as anti-lock brakes and electronic stability control. Rear parking sensors, auto headlights, auto wipers and cruise control are also all standard equipment.
Not so good Leather trimmed seats is an expensive option and unfortunately the big panoramic sunroof is also on the options list.