Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good Arriving Down Under in January 2013 the Proton Preve offers up a mix of comfort, space and good looks.

From the front the Proton Preve looks kind of sporty, there’s a lower air dam, fog lights and a set of LED lights cleverly intergraded into the front headlights. The front grille is quite unique featuring blacked out horizontal lines and chrome detailing, while the Proton badge sits proudly in the centre of the grille.

The bonnet features two character lines the run in a horizontal ‘V’ shape, these lines give the Preve a more masculine look.

From side on, the Proton Preve is squared with a straight line running along the vehicle. The roof line sits quite high at the front but dips down at the rear.

The rear tail lights are small and streamlined; this gives the rear a compact look that’s actually pretty nice. There’s also a boot lip design that’s quite conservative but adds a little flare.
Not so good Our only complaint would be the smallish 16-inch alloy wheels; they don't seem to fill the wheel guards as well say a set of aftermarket 18-inch alloys.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Inside, the Proton Preve is one pleasant small sedan to be in, the supportive seats feel comfortable and the driving position can be adjusted so drivers can find the perfect position.

The centre dash design is clean and uncomplicated, the in dash sound system features big clear buttons for navigation of radio and phone functions; the red dot LCD display is also easy to read.

Heat and air conditioning can be adjusted via the three turn knobs controls located under the radio sound system.

The interior is predominantly black with the exception of silver highlights found on the steering wheel, door handles and centre console. There’s also a dark wood grain trim that contrasts well with textured dash.

There’s plenty of room up front and just as much in the rear, there’s also a very generous boot for carting luggage or weekend shopping.
Not so good We found the centre arm rest sat a little high - there were a few moments where some of us would bump our elbow on it.
Performance

Performance

Good The Proton Preve range is powered by a 1.6-litre In-line four-cylinder petrol engine, managing 80kW of power @ 5750rpm and 150Nm of torque @4000rpm when matched to a 5-speed manual (6-speed Constantly Variable Transmission CVT).

We found the CVT smooth, there was little noise coming from the CVT while it hummed away at normal speeds. The 1.6-litre isn't going to win any races but at least you won't get a speeding ticket.
Not so good The 1.6-litre matched to the CVT begins to get a little noisy when you start to push higher in the rev range.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good This is where the Proton Preve shines; Proton has managed to tune the suspension so that it offers up a good balance of handling performance and comfort.

The Proton Preve feels right at home cruising along on the highway or tackling some twisted country roads. It’s also pretty good in and around the city, because it’s not an overly big vehicle parking is made easy.
Not so good We can't really fault the Preve here due it's Lotus engineered steering and suspension, it just does what you ask of it (within reason, it’s not a sports car).
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Did someone say 5-Year capped servicing as standard, 5-Year warranty, and 5-Year free roadside assistance? Yes, Proton did.

And, the best part is that the Proton Preve is also safe, scoring a 5 Star ANCAP rating with six airbags, ESC, ABS, front active head rests and pre-tensioner seat belts.

And from 1st August 2013, Proton reduced the Driveaway price for the manual from $18,990 to only $15,990!
Not so good We wish the 1.6-litre turbo engine that’s due here in mid-2013 would hurry up and get here.