Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good The Peugeot 207 wagon went on sale in Australia in October 2007 sporting 12cm of extra length over the 207 hatch to ensure a greater load carrying capacity. The mid life facelift (from December 2009) features revised front-end styling and an upgraded interior. At the same time the previous XT grade was replaced with the ‘Outdoor’ grade – technically it’s a special edition, however Australia gets a run of 150 units, all wearing SUV like black wheel arches, bumpers and sill extensions. The polished aluminium roof-rails are a classy touch.
Not so good We feel the 207 touring is a bit guilty of style over function – considering the wheelbase is a decent 2540mm we expected greater interior functionality. And at around 1350kg it’s heavy for a vehicle of this size.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good The front seats are comfortable, offer decent support and the steering adjusts for both reach and rake; the Outdoor grades features includes standard dual-zoned climate control air conditioning, partial leather and cloth trim (you can have it in Chocolate brown if you’re feeling adventurous!) and cruise control. The panoramic glass roof with electric sunblind creates an airy feel to the cabin. Whilst the boot isn’t overly large at just over 300 litres, the rear seats fold almost fully flat (with a neat one touch functionality) to create over 1,400 litres of storage capacity when required. The tailgate is easy to operate and the upper rear glass section can be opened separately. The cargo area includes a useful separate compartment for odds and ends, a luggage net and a 12-volt outlet.
Not so good Even with the steering and seat adjustability on offer a couple of our testers failed to get comfortable behind the wheel. Limited front row storage – a smallish glovebox and no centre console bin. Rear seat legroom is poor, best for children only; the centre seat in the second row is also too narrow for anyone but kids. Rearwards parking and lane changing visibility is only average due to the large rear ¾ pillars.
Performance

Performance

Good The 1.6L turbo diesel (offering 80kW and 240Nm) is definitely the pick of the two engines on offer. It has minimal turbo lag and provides more than enough ‘oomph’ when revving between 2,000rpm and 4,000rpm.
Not so good The 207 wagon is no featherweight (for a SUPERMINI anyway) at almost 1,350kg so neither the petrol or diesel ever feels quick. Below 2,000rpm the diesel feels sluggish. The 1.6L petrol (offering 88kW and 160Nm) has a harder task of pushing the 207 Touring along and unfortunately is the sole choice should you not wish to change gears yourself.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good Over smooth surfaces the 207 wagon offers a comfortable ride. Handling is typical for this sized vehicle, with a tendency towards understeer.
Not so good The ride should be better. It’s also less impressive over rough Aussie back roads where the 207 Touring can loose its composure. The steering (electrically assisted) can feel excessively heavy at low urban speeds and ideally should offer more natural feedback.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good The upgraded Touring ‘Limited Edition’ offers useful extra kit over the XT grade. Standard six airbags and ABS brakes are comforting. A full size spare wheel suits a vehicle with travelling aspirations. From June 2010 Peugeot dropped the Recommened Retail Price by a couple of thousand dollars.
Not so good Lack of electronic stability control (not even as an option) is less comforting. Whilst it has no competitors in the SUPERMINI segment (being the sole wagon), the nearly $30k asking price positions the 207 wagon against a number of impressive larger sized small family wagons and compact SUV’s.