Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good The Opel Insignia arrived down under in September 2012. The German designed, engineered and built Insignia, features elegant European styling that's a winner in our books. The German's have done a great job, the subtle lines are free flowing and give the Opel Insignia a sleek, yet elegant look. Up front, the bold and striking grille is 'pimped' out with chrome highlights and a lightning bolt badge that means business. From the side there is more 'bling', the side windows are framed in a strip of chrome, Opel say the chrome framing helps soften the Insignia’s muscular and sporty stance by optically slimming down the vehicle.
Not so good The Car Verdict team agree that the protruding rear end is the least attractive angle of the Opel Insignia.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Inside, the Opel Insignia is a classy place to be. The dash features a mix of soft touch materials and a gloss black highlights that give the interior a nice touch. The dials are clear and easy to read, at night they are illuminated by a reddish, orange light that is pleasing to the eyes. Door trims, instrument dials, gear shifter surrounds and the steering wheel all feature chrome or metallic silver highlights that contrast well with the rest of the interior. The leather seats and leather wrapped steering wheel are very comfortable, the perforated seat and steering wheel inserts offer up good levels of grip.
Not so good Much like the Opel Insignia Wagon, rearward visibility isn't the greatest, thanks to the sloping roof and the high set rear seating. The high set rear seats also make people over 6 foot feel a little cramped.
Performance

Performance

Good The Insignia sedan range comes with the choice of two turbocharged engines - one petrol and one diesel. Kicking things off is a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbo petrol, managing 162kW of power and 350Nm of torque when matched to a six-speed Sports Automatic transmission. While the more frugal of the bunch is a 2.0-litre four-cylinder turbo diesel, managing 118kW of power and 350Nm of torque when matched to a six-speed Sports Automatic transmission. Both turbocharged engines feel like they have massive amounts of power on tap. The initial lag is long forgotten once you pass 2700rpms as the turbocharger kicks in and fires the Insignia into life. There is also a hefty amount of torque on offer that makes hauling around five adults relatively easy.
Not so good The diesel is quite loud especially at idle when sitting at the lights. When you start to put your foot down the automatic transmission feels like it is scrambling to find the right gear.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good On road handling dynamics is where the Opel Insignia really shines. Coming into corners carrying some speed the Insignia sits flat and soaks most irregularities in the road with ease. The conventional McPherson strut front, and multilink, matched to either turbocharged engines means the Opel Insignia is a whole lot of fun.
Not so good Perhaps the only thing that lets the Opel Insignia sedan down is that it's front wheel drive.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good The Opel Insignia is a solid performer across the board, it ticks a lot of the right boxes in terms of equipment and it has the looks to match too. The Insignia comes equipped with peace of mind, featuring dual front, side and curtain airbags, Electronic Stability Control, traction control and ABS all as standard across the range. Available on the entry model is two-way active head restraints and this increases to four-way active head restraints on the Select model.
Not so good Much like its wagon sibling the sedan has it all, except brand loyalty that is built up over the years.