Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good 2nd generation Murano: modern, distinctive styling. Whilst this Nissan looks similar to the previous model every body panel is actually new! Plus, they've worked on and improved the rear-end design.
Not so good Front grille design is very distinctive - but to some it isn't "particularly attractive" (beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so who cares what others think!).
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Great frontal visibility; extremely comfortable, soft front seats. The modern, premium-feeling dash is a big leap over the previous generation (same as the Maxima - they also share the same platform!?) The standard leather trim is tasteful, and if you look closely you’ll see some fancy double stitching. The rear seats offer sufficient legroom & cleverly fold down when not needed. The boot will easily swallow a couple of large suitcases and with the rear seats folded a full-size road bike will easily fit in. The Ti grade now comes standard with a full-width dual-panel electric sliding sunroof/moonroof.
Not so good The orange backlighting on the instrument cluster is a touch old school. Rear seat headroom is only average. Chucky rear pillars minimise rear visibility when reversing...
Performance

Performance

Good Nissan’s 3.5L V6 engine is a refined engine (over the year’s Nissan have collected a number of global engine awards with this powerplant - it is in the Maxima and the previous 350Z). It may be refined, but it'll still rev when you want it to! CVT transmission is a decent match to the V6.
Not so good Whilst the engine is tuned to offer slightly more power & torque than the one Nissan’s Maxima large sedan, the Murano is almost 250kg heavier - so acceleration from standstill is not sports-car-quick.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good Comfortable ride (the suspension is a little firm over bumps but never harsh). The previous Murano promised sports-car handling but failed somewhat, so this Murano is more focused on luxury (and is all the better for it). Too many SUV’s try hard to offer sports car handling and end up offering too hard a ride for what is primarily a family vehicle. However don’t think this Murano handles like wet spaghetti; it certainly doesn’t - with greater torsional rigidity and revised suspension.
Not so good Not at the pointy end of SUVs when it comes to 'spirited driving' handling - prone to understeer when pushed. The steering could offer a greater 'feel' as to what the front wheels are doing...
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Improvements in noise insulation mean the Murano is a quiet and refined place to spend your time. It's well worth a look if you’re an empty-nester or have a young family (rear headroom is limited, but the boot is ample). Full-size spare tyre for reassurance on those long holiday drives rather than the all too popular "space saver". Fuel economy-wise - it's better than the Ford Territory and the Toyota Kluger...
Not so good If you require your Nissan to seat more than five than you’ll have to look to the more hardcore 7-seat Pathfinder - or the even more agricultural Nissan Patrol Wagon 4x4.