Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good Arriving down under in August 2012 the Nissan Almera was set to fill the light sedan gap in Nissan’s range.

The Almera is based off Nissan’s light hatch the Micra. However, Nissan have stretched the wheelbase by 155mm for added interior and boot space.

At the front the Almera features a fairly stubby nose; the front grille has a ‘V’ shaped design while the headlights are in the shape of a teardrop.
Not so good The profile of the Almera is quite bland and shapeless. Design wise Nissan falls short when you look at the likes of Hyundai’s Accent or Kia’s Rio.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Rear seat leg room is generous and the large 490-litre boot is quite good, however you can’t fold the rear seats flat limiting what you can carry.

Upfront, the Almera is pretty spacious; the dash layout gives you a sense of roominess.
Not so good Inside, the Almera feels quite uninspiring and the design theme doesn't seem to gel. It’s like Nissan couldn't make their minds up on what they wanted the interior to look like, so they have just mashed a whole bunch of components together and produced what you see in the Almera.
Performance

Performance

Good Powering the Almera range is a 1.5-litre in-line four cylinder petrol engine that produces 75kW of power and 139Nm of torque when matched to a 5-speed manual transmission or 4-speed auto (option on ST). The Ti variant is only available with a 4-speed automatic transmission.

The Almera features the same engine and drivetrain as the Nissan Micra, so it’s no surprise that the Almera is one zippy sedan.

City driving is where the Almera truly shines; zipping in-and-out of traffic is made easy with the responsiveness of the 1.5-litre.
Not so good Get the Almera out on the open road and you begin to see why the Almera is best suited to the city. The engine sounds tinny and coarse when accelerating hard.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good The Nissan Almera handles everyday roads quite well, the ride feels solid and corning performance is good.

City driving and parking is made easy with the feather-light steering while at highway speeds the steering tightens up giving you confidence at most speeds.
Not so good While the feather-light steering is good for parking and such, it isn’t so good for driver feedback leaving the driver with the feeling of being disconnected from the road.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Nissan has packed a whole host of features into the Almera in the hope of snagging some potential buyers in the light car segment. Bluetooth hands-free, steering wheel mounted audio controls, central locking with remote keyless entry and four-speaker audio system with MP3 player and auxiliary input jack as just some of the standard features you can expect.

For complete peace of mind the Nissan Almera offers Vehicle Stability Control, ABS with Electronic Brakeforce Distribution and Brake Assist.

Almera also includes six airbags across all grades, with dual front, side and curtain airbags.
Not so good The exterior design isn't very inspiring, poor interior design choices (lack of 60:40 folding seats in the rear) and the overall handling of the car let the package down. In a segment that has a lot on offer, the Nissan Almera isn't quite there.