Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good The Grandis’ looks have aged well, we first saw it here way back in 2004, however as this was the first Mitsubishi to be designed by their than new head designer, a Frenchman by the name of Oliver Boulay, it was a huge step forward over Mitsubishi’s previous commercial based box on wheels People Movers. Still relatively stylish today (well for a People Mover anyway) helped by sporty 17 inch alloys with lowish profile tyres.
Not so good It’s getting on in car years, launched here in May 2004 when rival Honda was still to release their now previous generation Odyssey (arriving only one month after the Grandis release), yet whilst Mitsubishi are still selling this now over six year old vehicle, Honda’s Odyssey was replaced with a new model in 2009! So the Grandis ain't no spring chicken.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Considering the not overly large exterior footprint, Mitsubishi has done a great job with the Grandis’ truly flexible 7 seat interior; cabin storage and quality is also up to scratch. The driver enters into an airy cabin thanks to the large windscreen, and is greeted with standard leather seats, sporty alloy pedals and climate control air-conditioning (the second row also has independent A/C controls). Surely the most important feature of a People Mover is its seating arrangement and Mitsubishi have well and truly ticked this box. The second and third row both offer good flexibility, the middle row bench splits 60/40, slides, tilts and folds down flat, whilst the back row bench splits 50/50 and the seats fold fully flat into the floor. The party trick is that the third row seats can face backwards when parked, perfect for watching the kids at sport, or maybe for you and your partner overlooking a romantic sunset. Also of note is an illuminated glove box and storage compartments under the third row.
Not so good The plastics around the dashboard are more old school hard than modern squishy and the steering adjusts for rake but unfortunately not reach. The slightly limited third row headroom means tall teens will be better off in one of the front two rows, however legroom is pretty good. None of the seats can be removed (well easily anyway).
Performance

Performance

Good The 2.4L four cylinder petrol with 120kW of power and 216Nm of torque is on par with a number of competing four cylinder powered competitors. On the move it performs decently moving along the almost 1,650kg kerbed weight and displays good levels of quietness when driven sensibly.
Not so good Becomes noisy and less refined at higher revs, which you’ll experience whenever hurrying along with a full load inside. Whilst the power figures were class leading back at launch, they are nothing to shout about today (but to be fair the newer competing Honda Odyssey’s figures aren’t much better). The Grandis makes do with a four speed Automatic gearbox, where a more modern five or six speed gearbox would be more appropriate.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good Above average ride and above average handling compared to most People Movers. Thank the passenger rather than a commercial derived platform and the relatively low centre of gravity.
Not so good The steering is too light to install real confidence and lacks feedback. Handling is below the segment best Odyssey (yes, we just can’t help mentioning the Honda again). Pretend you’re in a sports car on a twisty road and the Grandis will let you know quickly that you’re asking too much.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good On the safety front the Grandis comes standard with Anti-lock brakes, six airbags and standard reversing sensors. Seven cupholders and four bottle holders should keep everyone happy on a hot summer’s day. The Grandis is now offered in sole VR-X spec = sporty enhancements such as front fog lights, low profile 215/55 series 17 inch alloys and the side mirrors are electric folding.
Not so good Disappointingly misses out on Electronic Stability Control and the curtain airbags are front two rows only. Official combined fuel consumption of 10.2L per 100kms is poor for a four cylinder MPV and resale rating doesn’t match the competing Honda Odyssey.