Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good By far the best LS design yet - the first generation which actually looks sporty from a number of angles. The massive 19-inch alloy wheels help to shrink the 5-metre long visual mass, as does the sharp crease line running from the top of the front grille to the rear boot. The overall exterior is refined and stylish.
Not so good Still more restrained than the competing S-Class with the over-sized wheel arches; however, some of us at the office think that the LS is the better looking of the two vehicles?

Weight has increased over 100kg since the previous generation LS, however power and torque figures have also increased.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good You won’t find a more comfortable cabin to spend hours inside for similar money. 4-way individual heating and air-conditioning controls; 19-speaker (yes, 19!) Mark Levinson sound system is brilliant. Plus, enjoyable little touches like the chilled compartment behind the centre rear seat and the auto open-and-close boot lid. The rear seats also feature a recline and massage function.
Not so good This Lexus bucks the trend of the competition with no mouse-like interface system for the centre dash information screen (we'd bet that the next-gen LS does though); however, the buttons are positioned in a logical manner.

We found the interface of the audio/sat nav system a little dated when compared to its competitors, the DVD/CD player doesn't support all file formats and there is no Bluetooth Audio streaming only phone connectivity.

Although the LS600h features an auto park function it takes a while to calibrate and by the time you have set it up someone has either stolen your space or you've just parked the car yourself.
Performance

Performance

Good For such a large and refined luxury sedan the LS460 is damn quick sprinting from 0 – 100km/h in 5.7 seconds. Under hard acceleration the fantastic throaty engine note enters the cabin (lovely!). The 8-speed auto (a world first for Lexus) is so smooth and it contributes to the impressive fuel consumption.

The bigger brother of the LS460 is the LS600h. Powering the LS600h is a 5.0-litre V8 that is electrically-assisted, combined the total power output is 327kW. The LS600h is a very smooth ride and can sprint from 0 – 100km/h in 6.3 seconds which is pretty impressive when you consider the LS600h weighs in at around 2.5 tonne. Official fuel figures are 9.3-litres per 100km combined.
Not so good Because the LS features double glazed windows most of the outside noise is cancelled out which is good and bad. The bad being you have to really push your right foot down to really hear the glorious V8 under the bonnet.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good In terms of handling the LS600h is up to the task, although the vehicle is just over five metres in length it doesn't really pose as a problem. The L600h feels at home on Australian roads with the suspension absorbing pretty much anything you throw at it. The clever air suspension and low profile large alloy wheels are a great combo – grip is commendable.
Not so good The electrically-assisted powering steering is good for managing the size of the LS but it lacks in driver feedback and weight (for driving enthusiasts).
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Improved styling is attracting younger buyers (than the previous LS). Also, there's no need to spend thousands of dollars on costly extras (as almost everything is standard). The LS also features the world’s first dual-chamber front airbags!
Not so good No Turbo Diesel option at this time, although there is a Hybrid variant, the LS600h, but it is quite a step up in price over the LS460.