Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good The Range Rover Sport is one massive vehicle that sits high above traffic. Design wise the Sport features a rather squared design, the huge rectangle headlights fit nicely into the large straight front fascia and the streamlined grille looks like it would devour anything in its path.

From the side the Sport features large flared wheel guards and a nice little air vent detail on either side of the front quarter panel.

The Range Rover Sport fills its flared wheel arches with an array of 19 or 20-inch alloy wheels depending on variant and/or options selected.
Not so good The rear end of the Range Rover Sport is perhaps its least flattering angle. The rear tail lights look clumsily placed and don't really gel with the overall look of the vehicle. But that's just our opinion...
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Inside, the Range Rover Sport spoils you with comfort and elegant design. The front leather seats feel great and offer up plenty comfort and support, this is especially good over longer journeys.

One of the greatest features to be added to the Sport line-up is the 7-inch Dual View touch-screen that allows the driver to view the navigation display whilst the passenger watches a DVD.

There is also a Hard Disc Drive Music server that allows you to save your favourite music, Dual Tuner to give a seamless signal, iPod and video streaming by USB, audio streaming by Bluetooth and two USB ports that are located in the console lid.

There is also a combination of Harman Kardon audio systems available across the range with 11 or 17 speakers on offer depending on how you like to listen to your music.
Not so good While the Range Rover Sport looks rather large on the outside, inside the interior feels a little cramped.
Performance

Performance

Good The Range Rover Sport line-up comes with the choice of three engines.

To kick things off the 3.0-litre V6 turbo diesel produces 180kW of power and 600Nm of torque when matched to a 6-speed Sports Automatic.

Stepping things up is a 5.0-litre V8 that produces 276kW of power and 510Nm of torque when matched to a 6-speed Sports Automatic.

If the naturally aspirated V8 wasn't enough for you there is a supercharged 5.0-litre V8 that pumps out 375kW of power and 625Nm of torque when matched to a 6-speed Sports Automatic.

Our test vehicle was fitted with the 3.0-litre V6 turbo diesel. The V6 was quite smooth, offering up plenty of torque to get the 2.5 tonnes of vehicle moving.
Not so good While the 3.0-litre V6 turbo diesel offered up smooth power delivery it wasn't as refined as some of it's German competitors.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good The entire Sport range comes equipped with air suspension, the beauty of this type of suspension set up is that the air bags in the suspension seem to absorb just about any terrain thrown its way.

Pot holes, corrugated roads and any unsealed roads are a breeze to drive over plus the adjustable ride hight give you extra ground clearance when needed.

Overall the Sport range is quite a cruisy ride and one best enjoyed over a long journey.
Not so good Because of it's comfortable nature and air suspension isn't very good when it comes to handling and cornering dynamics. It's like driving a car that is placed on a massive water bed.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good Design and equipment levels have moved up a notch from previous models, with exterior colour changes to detailing and new interior colour ways for the Autobiography Sport. A new powered tailgate has also been introduced as standard from Luxury models upwards, enabling drivers to set their desired lift height.

There is also the inclusion of the next generation 7-inch touch-screen with optional Dual View technology and a combination of upgraded Harmon Kardon audio systems to sweeten the deal.
Not so good Resale values might not be as strong as some of its Luxury SUV competitors and is definitely something to consider when purchasing a Range Rover.