Design and Engineering

Design and Engineering

Good Ever since the 300C hit our shores in October 2005 it has received a lot of attention - and for good reason.

The newest generation Chrysler 300C is poised to continue this tradition. Arriving down under in July 2012 the 300C features refined styling and sharp pricing.

The front instantly makes a bold statement with its large chrome grille and sleek headlights. The long wheelbase combined with the slab sided profile and blistered wheel arches, topped off by a ‘chopped’ roofline definitely leave a lasting impression.

The HSV fighting SRT8 grade does without a tacky bodykit and remains very understated.
Not so good If you don't really fancy ‘bling’, this car might not be for you, as it demands attention anywhere you go.
Interior and Styling

Interior and Styling

Good Inside, the Chrysler 300C is very classy, the dash is covered in soft touch plastics and depending on the model - wood or carbon fibre highlight inserts finish off the cabin.

The dash features a 8.4-inch colour touchscreen multimedia system that includes Sat Nav, USB & AUX connectivity and Bluetooth Phone and Audio streaming. The analog clock that sits above the touchscreen is also a nice touch.

Sitting behind the steering wheel is a set of chrome highlighted dials that are illuminated by an ice blue colour that gels well with the elegant interior. Between the dials is a colour LCD screen that displays vehicle information such as average fuel, distance till empty and average speed.

The leather seats are very comfortable, offering up plenty of support for occupants. The steering wheel adjusts for both height and reach, allowing drivers to find the perfect driving position.
Not so good The cabin doesn't feel as special as we’d hoped – but than again it’s hard to match that exterior styling. Overall fit & finish could also be better (some panel gaps are a little too large).
Performance

Performance

Good Chrysler offers up three engines in total – a turbo diesel, a petrol V6 and the heart pounding SRT V8.

Kicking things off is the 3.6-litre 6-cylinder petrol engine, producing 210kW of power and 340Nm of torque when matched to an 8-speed Sports Automatic.

Next up, the 3.0-litre 6-cylinder diesel engine, producing 176kW of power and 550Nm of torque when matched to a 5-speed automatic transmission.

Sitting at the top of the food chain is the 6.4-litre 8-cylinder petrol engine, pumping out a massive 347kW of power and 631Nm of torque when matched to a 5-speed automatic transmission.

The V6 petrol is awesome value for money buying, and best of all it's smooth and quiet.
Not so good The 5-speed automatic is no match for the 8-speed Sports Automatic found in the V6 petrol.
Ride and Handling

Ride and Handling

Good The 300C features a very relaxed suspension tune, it happily cruises along at highway speeds soaking up any abnormalities in the road.

All grades are impressively quiet, thanks to the acoustic windscreen and heavy use of sound-deadening foam.
Not so good Weighing in at over two tones the 300C isn't the most nimble of vehicles, but that’s not to say you can't have fun driving it. The steering could be sharper and feels a little light.
Buying and Owning

Buying and Owning

Good The Chrysler 300C ticks all the necessary safety boxes offering customers electronic stability control (ESC), full-length side-curtain airbags, seat-mounted side thorax air bags, driver’s knee bag, dual seat belt pretensioners on front-row seats, front-row reactive head restraints, ABS, All-Speed Traction Control (ASTC), Brake Assist, Hill-start Assist, Rain Brake Support and Ready Alert Braking.

With the amount of features on offer we highly recommend the V6 petrol as it represents great value for money.
Not so good The 3.0-litre 6-cylinder diesel engine offers up great fuel economy but comes with the old 5-speed automatic.